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with compliance departments and upstarts with energy and ideas. this status inequality demands our attention. last week's bipartisan passage of the unfunded mandate's transparency and information act is a good start, but much more must be done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the chair will receive message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: mr. secretary. the secretary: i am directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina eek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, transitioning from military to civilian life can be challenging for our veterans. the skill sets learned while serving in the armed forces are highly valued and confidence is extraordinary of veterans who have proven work ethic.
in the ukraine. deteriorating. the country's energy situation is crucial. after the break, we'll find out who is waiting in -- who is weighing in on the ukraine's power struggles. ♪ >> welcome back. we're taking a closer look at europe's energy situation. affected by the conflict in the ukraine. what happens next is completely up in the air. joining us now is the executive chair of the global energy symposium. let's talk about europe's exposure to russian gas and the ukrainian throughput. to what extent should we be worried by the escalating situation? >> the longer this crisis remains, the greater the impact is going to be on energy expectations in europe. we are already seeing that this morning. of any has happened great significance in the ukraine other than some russian troops showing up in the crimea. it has been enough to start spiking prices and spiking future levels. that is going to be more pronounced as we move forward. the interesting thing is what is already doing in new york, which i think is an overreaction at -- moment, given what is at what is actually occurring. i keep tell
is blackmailing europe over energy. >> customers continue to say they need the pipeline. >> fossil fuel industry will always outspend everybody else. >> look at what is happening in ukraine. >> it's mainly about energy. >> great suggestions, one the keystone pipeline. >> marketplace continues to push to build the pipeline. >> i'm right when i talk about that inherent link between energy and security. >> i know that pipeline is necessary. >> america needs pipelines. >> good to have you with us. thanks for watching. we're getting into the say anything, do anything phase of the keystone xl pipeline. all the smart people saying we got to have it. we must not be very secure right now. if we don't build this pipeline, we're not going to be very secure. you see, conservatives what they're doing right now is that they are exploiting a foreign policy situation overseas to get something that they really want and they really don't know a whole hell of a lot about. they are shamelessly using the crisis in the ukraine to push for the keystone xl pipeline. i say not so fast. the conservative noise machine is
the east of core ukraina lot of russian speakers there, fireworks in terms of energy prices in terms terms of energy prices in europe. >> europe depends on the infrastructure, tried to diversify a way away from russian energy, through the cast pecaspea sea. >> because the domestic supplies from these critical producers are dhoining, that really -- declining that really the pipeline supplies at a will be available for europe will be -- that will be available will be largely from russian gas. >> european leaders understand that, that's why they are calling for dialogue with, not sanctions against, russia. ali velshi, al jazeera. >> warren hogue, and from providence, rhode island, thomas nichols, professor of national security affairs. gentlemen, welcome. >> thank you. >> warren, let me start with you if i might. angela merkel suggested that the russian president is out of touch with reality tonight. is that just rhetoric or they have just lost control? >> i think what she said was he was from a different planet. i think exactly he is from a different planet. the russians view this differentl
energy costs down whether it be in refining where he has the best chemicals to be able to get the most gasoline out of dirty oil, for instance, in the turbo which is what you need to be able to low your -- get more mileage out of each gallon. that's a very important thing. and, of course, he does the cockpits for pretty much everybody. he's done a remarkable job in honeywell, my charitable trust owns it. it's just been a gigantic winner. at one point they asked him about activism and he had a great answer when your stock goes up all the time the activists don't call. good man. >> is it your favorite industrial name? >> definitely. >> really? >> yeah dave cody is a remarkable guy, and yes, i'll admit we are next-door neighbors and he's also a terrific guy in person. >> you can't argue with what he brings to the interview and certainly with the stock as you said. we'll watch that closely along with exxon also having a -- >> yes, down. >>> in the meantime, former microsoft ceo steve ballmer giving a talk to graduate students at the university of oxford's school o
. it is a loan guarantee. it still needs approval by congress. it would help cover some of the energy costs in the ukraine, because they would be losing probably the energy subsidies they get from russia. they are also talking about sending technical advisors in a whole host of areas first to work with the central bank and finance ministry, also to train election monitors, there is the hope there could be an election in may in ukraine. and the hope is that the u.s. can train monitors to ensure that is a free and fair election. and they also want to send technical advisors to help ukraine identify and recover any stolen assets we have heard about president yanukovych and the oligark, spirit billions of dollars out of the country. the administration has been saying that it has a wide host of sanctions that it can consider. they would be done through presidential executive order. they have already taken some diplomatic steps. they have pulled back on preparations for the g-8 summit. they have canceled trade talks. and what they are talking about as far as further sanctions could be the freezin
to happen. but at the end of the day, the only options we have are to increase our own energy independence, put energy in a position where putin doesn't have access to the energy reserves and to the reknew that's he's had in the past. so whether this president does it or the next president does it, somebody has to do it. and i keep going back, shannon, you know, we survived jimmy carter, we're going to survive barack obama, but it will be incumbent on the next president to stop president obama. otherwise, neither will stop president putin. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> thank you, shannon. >>> the top democrat in the senate says the obamacare horror stories are live. that has some experiencing them first hand pretty fired up. >> i'm completely outraged. it's absolutely ridiculous. >> we're going debate the issue fair and balanced, of course, next. >>> another snowstorm spreading across the country gearing up to hit the east coast tonight. whether you want them or not, you need to know. [ female announcer ] a classic macaroni & cheese from stouffer's starts with freshly-made
television service. number three is fuel energy. fuel cell, which reports earnings on march 10, is one of the most overbought stocks. >> i am talking cars. the auto-parts retailer reporting in nine percent increase as well as sales growth of four percent. severe winter weather actually helps sales by accelerating demand area >> number one is radioshack. shares plunged more than 25% after the electronics chain announced plans to close up to 1100 stores in the u.s., or 20% of its footprint. radioshack also reported a significantly wider loss for the fourth quarter. are also keeping our eyes on shares of smith and west. the gunmaker reporting earnings after the close today. a bumpy ride for alix steel, and paul barrett joins us from washington. on god's.t with you we saw them take off in 2013 under the threat of more regulation. what is happening, why this decline now? >> there has not been any kind of tragedies. if you take a look at federal background check which analysts say can be a relatively good barometer for sales, they tend to increase we see some kind of national shooting. auror
are under way. they can develop alternative energy supplies, including fracking. including as the united states becomes an energy exporter, there are alternative sources there in the future and sources -- the inauguration of of the new pipeline project from the caspian sea which will be a new route for gas supplies into europe, not passing through russia, not from russia. this infrastructure will take time to develop but it is important to do so. the world is becoming increasingly unstable. this latest example to world peace is the classic case in my view. will the foreign secretary array with me -- agree with me that our country must rethink the funding of our armed forces to make sure we have the ships, the navy, the air force to me potential threats in the future. i am not hinting we should go to war on this case but it is a reminder we need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defen
the world. >>ali, shock wave to the energy prices? >> yes, oil prices, that is global, that rose 2%, $105s a barrel now and we are going to feel that at the pumps and the price natural gas in germany and uk jumped 10%. germany is an industrial power house and depends on natural gas for electricity and call coming from russia, 40% of the the natural gas coming from russia through the ukraine and that is not good news. this is not affecting u.s. natural gas. we don't want to see russia pushing europe back into a recession because we all know that hitting us all. >> what other aspects are you looking at? >> i am looking at a guy that bidding plumbing and manufacturing parts and he exports them and invests in a factory operation in crimea, and he's doing this for a while and i am going to talk to him about affecting his business so we are connected. >> thank you, ali and thank you. we have a response to the ukrainian crisis on social media. >> ukrainians are going online and expressing their feelings on what is happening in their crime. a woman is saying she wants peace, not war and take a loo
is exceptionally weak in ukraine. and what's more, the eu imports most of its energy from russia, which is a top oil producer. should putin take the risk and turn off the taps, as he did with ukraine in 2009 and in 2006, it could spell disaster for europe and, perhaps, the u.s. as the "new republic" notes, "any supply shocks in europe that send prices higher will have ripple effects that raise gas prices in the united states." fiona hill is an expert on russia and eurasian affairs at the brookings institution. fiona, thanks for being here. let's start with that question. you do have a lot of criticism of the president saying that he needs to take stronger action. what conceivable stronger action could be taken? >> well, the problem is, as you've just laid out, that the strong action that the president can take really is very dependent on being in lock step with our european allies. the real impact of any sanctions would only be felt on russia if the eu and other key allies are with us in the way that we are all acting together in the sanctions against iran and our dispute over iran's nuclear pro
and energy expansion cancelling preparations for a g8 summit in sochi, russia are temporary and could be reveersed. if the united states and its western allies hit russia with economic sanctions or deny moscow access to global financial networks and key international bank accounts the damage to the russian economy could be longlasting and it could put u.s.-russian relations in the deepest, most confrontational stance they've been in the entire obama presidency. some believe putin has overplayed his hand and will not fire shots in crimea and will not move his forces into less friendly parts of ukraine. with canada great britain, france, and germany all against russia moscow's own status in the g8 is also in jeopardy. these nations are also preparing, along with the united states, an economic package to rescue the transitional and fragile government in ukraine itself. the united states doesn't need or want to punish russia necessarily for this violation of the international law. it wants moscow to back off and ease the tensions. right now, as elizabeth palmer ju
, there could be fireworks in terms of energy prices. >> europe depends on natural gas and pipes that brings in through russia and the ukraine. europe tried to diverse vi away by investing in pipelines to the caspian see and north africa. growth in europe's demand for the natural gas eats up much of the new participation supply. >> europe is primarily pipeline gas market. because the domestic supplies from the critical producers are declining, that really the pipeline supplies that will be available for europe will be largely from russian gas. >> european leaders understand this, and are calling for dialogue with, not sanctions against russia. >> the threat of economic sanctions is taking a toll on russian's currency, hitting a record low on monday. >> the murder trial of former olympic blade runner oscar pistorius is under way. oscar pistorius is accused of the valentine's day 2013 shooting of his girlfriend model reeva steenkamp. the first witness told the court she heard a woman's blood cu curdling screams, and then gunfire. oscar pistorius said he mistook his girlfriend for a burglar. >>
energy, and education. outside, more than a dozen protesters and a few israeli supporters gathered along shoreline boulevard. >> the countries long ago stopped all of their business with apartheid south africa so now governor brown thinks it's okay to form this relationship is just beyond disgusting. >> israel is a tiny desert country, they've been dealing with, for example, water use issues all of their existence and after three years of drought, we have the same issues here. we could learn so much from israeli technology. >> reporter: security was tight around the event. we saw secret service around the building and also used dogs to patrol the area. after this, netanyahu is scheduled to visit other leaders. david louis is inside the event right now. you can follow him on twitter and catch his reports on later editions of abc 7. reporting live in mountain view, matt keller, abc 7 news. >> thank you. >>> bart service has finally resumed several hours after a man was hit and killed by a train. abc 7 news reporter joins us live with this very sad story. amy? >> reporter: i just got briefe
? >> yes, some of them will work, there's no question about that. it's just a question of how much energy is going to be put into the device to get it to work. what's going to be the most energy efficient way to do this, because remember, we have to get the craft up there that's going to do the work, we have to give it capability to maneuver around in space. once the technology that's going to be used to remove something from orbit, one of the ideas of attaching a tether so it builds friction and pulls the object down is not such a bad idea, because it doesn't require a lot of material to do that. if you could just push something out of orbit, that might not be a bad idea, because it may not require a large energy budget to make that work. you keep the expenses down in energy and materials and get the job done, it's just that those methods are slow and there's a lot of material that needs to be cleaned up. if there was a faster way to do it, that might be better. >> boy, that's certainly a big problem. nasa's budget was just announced or at least what they're hoping for the budget the nex
weather just ahead witness to rock and roll energy. >> the iconic work of a rock and roll photographer the secret behind a legendary shot. >> old time practice some people are turning to in the battle against the california drought. that and more as the news at 4:00 c so i was basically uninsurable. now that i've got coverage, my doctor is a phone call or an e-mail away. i'm in. [ female announcer ] everyone deserves health insurance. are you in? visit coveredca.com and get covered today. >>> the fortunate among us find our bliss and turn it into a job. >> one man found his bliss in history and performances of rock and roll. >> in the world of concert rock and roll, nothing trumps ak sexes if you have it, you don't buy dinner. you eat with the band. >> trust is a part of the whole thing. >> ask him about access >> feeling energy from the stage with these musicians is a he is on a first name basis with the band >> what do you play? >> i play camera. >> does he ever. chances are you don't know his name but his work, iconic. >> this is visual an thro thropologie. >> wonderful photos. >> u
economic leverage over ukraine because of the supply of energy. he has some influence in western europe, which still gets 25% of their energy from russia. so i think he's sitting there thinking that, in fact, he probably holds the better hand here for whatever negotiation is to come. >> charlie: do you believe he holds the better hand? >> frankly, based on what i'm hearing out of western europe and the reluctance of the europeans to embrace tough sanctions, i think, at least right now, i think he does. >> charlie: so if the europeans are not willing to go forward with tough sanctions, we're in a bad place. >> i think we are. >> charlie: you also have suggested some of your fellow republicans should tone down their rhetoric. >> well, this is a serious crisis that the west is facing, and, you know, when i -- i spent most of my life in the government at a time when, during immediate crises, people came together and were supportive of the president basically with the old line that politics stopped at the water's edge. i think people, right now while the president is trying to get the allies
are all in talks with iran over its nuclear program. while they talk, energy companies are chomping at the bit to get back into theç islac republic. sanction-free. sharon epperson talking with two big companies now making plans to do just that. she joins us live in houston. hi, sharon. >> reporter: hi, sue. ceos of some of the major oil and gas companies in europe are really looking for investments overseas, including iran. i spoke to the ceo of totale in france, who said they are definitely interested in investing in iran under the right conditions. >> even on what we call the interim period, we might start discussing. we will not invest, we will not negotiate new terms until we can do it. >> reporter: the ceo of italy's eni was the first western oil company ceo to meet with iran's oil minister once that preliminary nuclear deal was reached last year at the end of last year. he says he applauds iran's decision to retool the terms of their business model and in terms of enticing more investment in iran's energy sector, but he says there are definitely some changes that need to be
some energy, but to turn that into money might be seven to ten years' window. but what's important about phase one if you have major oil players from the u.s. and russia and europe and china engaged in the sector, in the eastern mediterranean alongside israel and cyprus which relates to then turkey and the e.u. and all of that, it might create for lebanon an investment in its stability and its long-term viability because of the importance of energy. similar to what, how the gulf sort of gets its stability and security. the gulf countries are, you know, strange tribes, but they survived because they have important resources. other parking lots of the world -- parts of the world sometimes have that as well. that's very important for lebanon's geostrategic environment. if the east and west agree that this must be a peace offul zone because there are important resources here, now actually moving forward on what's the economic value of this, the first thing is to figure out how to get it to market. the market is effectively europe. the original approach was or the plan was certainly to
.com. >>> the power of oil and gas, russia is a big energy supplier to europe, and that has global suppliers worried. we'll talk to ali velshi about that. >>> discussions at the white house between the leaders of israel and the united states. >>> an emergency session today at the white house. john terrett is life. the russians called this meeting. what were they trying to achieve? >> this was the third meeting in four days at the united nations security council. they have been talking only about ukraine and specifically about crimea. the russians called this meeting, and they wanted to put moscow's point of view to the rest of the world to explain what they really feel of the country of ukraine and the region of crimea. the long-standing ambassador to the united nations, read a letter which he said came from viktor yanukovych who was moscow's man until a couple of weeks ago, and called for russian forces to intervene in ukraine to save the country. afterwards they came out and read threater again. >> the country is in the grip of outright terror and violence driven by the west. in this context i app
a relatively modest economy with the exception of its energy capabilities and leverage. it's got a military that has a lot of nuclear weapons it's a conscript military. he is, today, punching way above his weight class, and the united states is punching way below ours. >> mr. secretary, thank you for talking to us, you bet. >> as the ukraine crisis gets worse even the mainstream media -- washington editorial saying president obama's foreign policy based on fantasy. former u.n. ambassador john bolton joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening, glad to be with you from london. >> yes. i don't mean to be heart beat on editorial. seems to be a departure when the "the washington post" comes out and uses the term fantasy at such an ominous time it's an accurate description of what's going on. the president's main problem is that he just doesn't care about america national security issues. he doesn't focus on it. he said back in the 2008 campaign that his priority was transforming american society. that's what he is up to. so, in 2008, nato made a terrible mistake when the europeans rejected our
,000,000,000 in energy subsidies to the ukraine because those subsidies are likely to be taken away because of an imf package. there is a real fear of what an imf loan package means, a structural adjustment package, huge cuts to the poorest in society to the sort we saw in greece and elsewhere, future unrest and the u.s. is quite a wear that when countries go down the road of imf loans, you can get even more unrest. another interesting thing about that energy subsidy is a lot of that money is going to end up in moscow because it's moscow who sells much of ukraine its fuel. in washington, they are quite a wear they are giving potentially a billion dollars to moscow. >> just how far is the u.s. supposed to go in supporting ukraine? at what point is it going to run up against opposition in congress? >> there is a lot of -- a lot of support for financial aid and financial loans to ukraine. however, the senate majority leader, harry reid said let's keep an idea on what europe wants. this is mainly a european issue. if europe isn't all for sanctions -- and they are not because they are scared of losing al
. they have such a diverse range of energy, infrastructure. it, they tend to have done well. one area that they have not done, one of the companies he has owned, one of the most famed companies that he holds. it has not borne fruit in 2013. it is got a lot of international exposure. u.s. and the growing economy. >> he holds many records. one long-standing record might come to an end this year. >> a 44 year record. it could be the first time he ever misses his target to increase the net worth more rapidly than the s&p 500. >> he doesn't care about the share price? >> he doesn't. you look at the book value of berkshire hathaway. since he took over it has outperformed the s&p 500. you look at five years, each five years always outperformed the s&p 500. this time it might not. 2013 was such a stellar year. the s&p 500 returned 128% since the end of 2008. that is a phenomenal performance but it is not living quite up to his usual target. 65, thet forget society book thought he was $19. year on year, compounded, generally you're getting 20% from berkshire hathaway. that heinz might be one o
, isolated location names and license really ought other countries for energy and water supplies, while luxury fashion makes it a pricey city for clothes. it rose six spots in this year's ranking. yen saw tokyo fall to sixth place, and caracas raucous, geneva, and melbourne. many living ine asian cities are in the top 10. new york claimed the vote defensive title for north america, but fell to 26 overall. paris charges the highest average price for a liberal natural -- liter of petrol. the french capital is beholden to the cheapest bottles of wine. benjamin netanyahu is readying his speech to the biggest row israel lobby in washington. president told u.s. barack obama he will never compromise on israel posse purity. israel's security. the u.s. president hiked up the pressure, saying it would be harder to protect israel if these efforts with the palestinian's failed. meeting face-to-face coming yards and to make the decisions needed to salvage the peace process. >> some decisions are going to have to be made, but i know that the prime minister will make those decisions based on his estim
and atmospheric administration, the department of energy, the environmental protection agency, the nuclear regulatory commission and the national institute of standards and technology. all said the same thing -- it's not their responsibility. >> one of our frustrations is our government hasn't taken this on as something we should sponsor in terms of our national interests. there is often a lot of finishing pointing going on and we hope in the long run we can make progress to find a home, as we call it. >> reporter: in the mean time, he is relying on foundation support and doing some crowd sourcing. >> all it takes is filling up one of these containers. >> reporter: he launched a web site and created these kits to make it easy for anyone to do some fieldwork. interested individuals and communities pay $550 for the fox, gather samples and ship them to woods hall for analysis. the data is shared online. so far donors have funded 33 sample sites. but how is the radiation affecting the creatures that live in the sea and ultimately the human beings who enjoy eating seafood? >> this one. at's ces
program and washington said it should be allowed to produce energy. mr. obama will hold a similar meeting with the president in two weeks. orthodox jews were in west jerusalem over the weekend. they were protesting a law being debated in the israeli parliament with men to be drafted into military service and orthodox jews have been exempt and they want to keep it that way. >> it's important to tell the state of isreal that we are opposed to their political philosophies that we feel that the contribution that the elements of society are making will help the army and through our contributions and the religious spectrum we are arm and arm with the army, helping the state of israel. >> reporter: the new legislation is expected to pass in the next few weeks. ultra orthodox jews makeup 10% of israel's population. a california state lawmaker facing corruption charges says he is taking a paid leave of absence and he is accused of accepting about 100,000 in bribes including meals and golf games in exchange for his political influence. he is pleading not guilty. and he is the second california sta
for collaboration on water, energy, and cyber technology security. >> solar, bio fuels alternative energies and others we're doing that. cyber we'll need to protect the privacy of individuals and not only public systems you don't want your user account to be pilfered. >> there is a lot we can do, learn, and share. israel is dynamic. >> invited guests were promoting international collaboration. >> transferring those to here, having partners to develop products here is very important. i think that this, this effort you saw in terms is just going to cement the relationship. >> this valley. >> it is to grow and create technology in a time line that would be possible without putting these things together. >> the goal to foster more sharing of knowledge. in mountain view, abc7 news. >> still ahead at 4:00 another frustrating warning for bart riders the trouble that delayed them for hours today. >> plus, he's back. and coming to the bay area. >> new at 4:30 sat exam getting a major overhaul. what that is going to mean for students. >> michael finney is taking your questions on twitter and facebook
that all he is interested in is domestic energy for peaceful purposes. the problem is that's not what's happening. what's happening is that the united states, through the state department and this administration, i think de facto has already but if not are on the verge of agreeing to allow iran to keep in place its enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, and i'm going to explain to you why that's a problem. if that capability is still there, if they retain all the facilities necessary for enrichment and reprocessing, even if they agree to limit to to a certain level for now at any point in time in the future they can ratchet it back up and they can go on to develop a weapon. in fact, the design for a weapon is the easiest part unfortunately of all of this. the hardest part is reaching the technological capability to enrich uranium to a certain point so you can weaponize it. if you allow them to keep all the equipment, all the technology, all the scientists, all that infrastructure in place, then at any point in the future when they decide now it's time for a weapon, they can break o
have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they're doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavy water facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. you know why iran insists on doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries don't do? it's because iran doesn't want a peaceful nuclear program. iran wants a military nuclear program. i said it here once. i will say it here again. if it looks like a duck, if it walks like a duck, if it quacks like a duck, then what is it? well, it ain't a chicken. and it certainly not a dove. it is still a nuclear duck. [applause] unfortunatelily the leading powers of the world are talking about leading iran with the capability to enrich uranium. i hope they don't do that because that would be a grave error. it would leave iran as a threshold nuclear power. it would enable iran to rapidly develop nuclear weapons, at a time when the world's attention is focused elsewhere. and we see, as we speak, that that could happen. in one part of the world today, tomorrow in another part, may
ago where i felt, actually, all the energy was in the commercial sector and the dynamism and the independence, of course, was in the commercial sector. but rta does reach across the whole country. it does reach into the rural areas. it does reach outside of the city. it does reach those populations who are not reached by the commercial media. and i think all media is important, but rta is absolutely key to the future of a country. particularly if it can become more independent. what, as we were talking about this morning, is needed in afghanistan is a national dialogue, is a national public debate. and i think one of the foundation stones for the national dialogue to come is something like, is rta. this is a difficult argument to make, actually. i mean, we support public service broadcasting around the world, and the number of success stories, successful transition of state characters to independent, financially-independent public broadcasters is not a big one. the political price of surrendering control of your state broadcaster by any incumbent president is very, very h
is announcing a $1 billion energy subsidy package. moscow amid worries that was ready to stretch its military rich further into the mainland. your reaction? guest: is a good sign the tangible support. it is important to remember that the united states along with russia and great written in 1994 -- in great britain in 1994 made certain assurances to the ukraine, and russia is now in violation. they need to respond to support ukraine and look for ways to in allies russia until they cease military action. host: president vladimir putin back, but saides that russia reserves the right to protect russians in the country and he accused the u.s. of encouraging an unconstitutional he hopes russia will not need to use force in predominantly russian-speaking eastern ukraine . guest: there is a certain irony there. first of all, president vladimir fled.ch when the agreement was signed, the russian representative refused to witness it. .here is a certain irony it has not been carried out because viktor yanukovych fled to russia. host: let's start with mario in connecticut on the line for democrats. good m
objectives affected by energy issues. while the national debate is over, tubes and mobile biological weapons labs, internal documents note that increased oil production in a post war iraq would have the vul effect of reducing world oil prices. >> prior to our even going to war in iraq, the focus was on oil. and iraqi oil and how to take it over far more than anything else. >> joining me now is rachel maddow, the host of the "the rachel maddow" show and "why we did it." what is the answer after all of your work on this? >> i think, andrea, the question is the most important part, which is the decisions of our generation on national security are determined more than anything by what the george w. bush administration did with that nine-year war in iraq and alongside of the 13-year war in afghanistan that's still going on. the american people are against those wars. those are the determine tif constraint for thinking about everything from crimea to syria to what the overall size of the u.s. military is. if we want avoid those protracted foreign -- we can't make good decisions until we understand
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-- of its energy from russia, from russian natural gas. sometimes it goes even higher than that. so they are going to be very reluctant to do the kind of comprehensive sanctions which would deprive them of that energy. and as you point out, london's role as a financial center is dependent upon other things, russia's capital. i think we should push for as comprehensive sanctions as we can get. you're never going to get totally comprehensive sanctions, but they do exact a price. and what we're trying to do here, as i see it, what the united states is trying to do with many members of the international community, make russia pay some price, some significant price, isolate it, and send a signal that this is not how we want business to be conducted in the 21 s century. you're not going to be able to stop it in its tracks. you're not going to be able to send troops into crimea. but the fact that we can't get 100% leak proof sanctions doesn't mean we shouldn't try to raise the bar and exact some price. >> i would like you to listen, fareed, to what the secretary of state, john kerry, said
clean energy source out there. they will not abandon their clean energy. these companies have ways of getting it done. stuart: you are clearly in a celebratory mood. kandi technologies. this is a chinese company. they rent cars, electric cars by that hour and get a government subsidy. you liked it. charles: up 38% from last monday. $14.20. 19.5 now. stuart: thank you, charles. nsa leaker edward snowden will appear from russia via satellite. we are talking technology and snooping. you represent young people. i have to believe that nsa snooping is a real big issue for millennial's like yourself. you do not like this, do you? >> i think that young people look at it like a rockstar. they want to learn more. the government is looking at every single tweet. they are just very interested. i think the aclu chair will be interviewing him. what is really interesting about this is young people look at this as a problem. stuart: exactly right. you do not lean to the right. you are in a different place. libertarians have an extremely important role for the young vote. >> absolutely. right. i th
on the gaspron export account with his for gazprom, the giant energy company majority controlled by the russian government. they were working both those accounts and setting up both. that's how it works in washington. >> are they all american citizens? >> they are, as far as i can tell. we called all of these firms for comments. none would call us back except for maslansky, who said they didn't see anything wrong working for the russians. we didn't have a chance to ask key questions like that, but looking at the bios on a lot of these web sites, it does appear that the majority of them are american citizens. >> if they're not, we can throw them out. this leads to another point i made at the top of the show. people coming in from russia or wherever, and i'm especially thinking about the oligarchs, who like to travel freely, there's the act that allows personal sanctions or revoke visas. basically either throw foreigners out or not let them in. the president has the authority. that bill was passed just a couple years ago. now it could be a powerful weapon. >> what is interesting here is the forei
. this is all because of what's happening in ukraine? >> you have the biggest energy user. we see these spikes in oil when we have tensions rise in the middle east, and then they come back down again when you see those recede. when people talk about trade sanctions, you can see how it could hit the likes of russia. 20% of their national income comes from natural gas alone. so it could hurt them. you have to say, russia is not iran. i was looking at some of the stats from b.p. statistical review. a third of natural gas imports into e.u. come from russia. any kinds of trade sanctions there would hurt russia, and it would hurt europe, too. >> and there are questions raised about what will be the spongs in terms of sanctions, but also what will be the russian response with regard to gas supplies. the gas problem has been suggesting it could end natural gas discounts to ukraine and that could have effects to the rest of europe. >> it would definitely do that. the gas problem today is one of the biggest in the equity market down to almost 10%. they are -- down almost 10%. they are getting hit hard.
missions canceled. naval cooperation talks canceled. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. until the crisis in crimea is further resolved. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? guest: the economic situation in russia may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. this is according to senior officials. they think that the russian ruble will tumble. willinvestment in russia fall. and that this will have a cumulative effect to pushing those who can influence moscow to have a change of calculus. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. putin has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he has to suffer under, he is willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. host: what is the point of all this? from mr. putin's position. guest: for putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. he believes, and many russian
on russian energy. the u.s. called a halt, but there's a question over existing ties. the u.s. imports $27 billion worth of russian goods and exports $11 billion. the u.s. barack obama is considering sanctions against russian officials, including asset feeses and visa bans. rory challands joins us live from moscow. we are outlining the options. hearing - we have lost the connection to rory. apologies for that. we'll move on for now. not everyone in crimea is happy with russia's increased involvement. we have a report on the fears of the tatar population and their problems with the ethnic russian population. >> this has been the loudest criticism of russia's military take over of the crimea since it began last friday. most of the women are crimean tatars, a well organised educated minority horrified by the intervention. >> i'm afraid. i see that people are afraid. i see the fear in their eyes. we can feel that -- we cann feel that we are safe. >> the edge of town may be a greater place to agitate. >> this is a clear sign that not everyone in crimea thinks that this has been a liberation. in
the united states was sending voluntary contributions to the international atomic energy administration, whose voluntary contributions above membership dues were going to create capacity of the nuclear facility not in the national interest of the united states not in the national interest of the state of israel. for a decade i was told my concerns had no legitimate basis , that iran would never be able to bring the plant online and that iran's nuclear activities were not a major concern. history has shown us those assessments about iran's abilities and intentions were civilly wrong man -- wrong man and i believe they are wrong today. i am skeptical of iran keeping its promises. and what we should expect before we moved to an agreement that we would hope permanently dismantles iran's to clear weapon program. i support a diplomatic row gram to get us to a deal. this must be reinforced by international commitment to international regime -- to sanctions against iran. we must keep the pressure on. we cannot let them opt you skate -- obvious gate -- obfuscate to make sure they never have the
alternative energy, cyber security, and bio-tech. they will also get access to innovation hubs. it includes 16 clusters of tech incubato incubators. and although mr. netanyahu has one supporter out here, there are protestors that say the governor should not come to an agreement with the prime minister until the isreali palestine issue is solved. >> we should not have relations with isz yal. we should treat them the same way as any country doing ethnic cleansing and committing these crimes against their neighbors. >> the protestors have been out here since 7:00 this morning. the prime minister was schedule todd be here at 10:30 after an extensive security of the inside and perimeter of the computer history museum. we'll give you a live picture of some of the protestors out here. they are waving the isreali flag in support. and other protestors are out here welcoming him in mountain view. he will go to stanford after this visit. >>> thank you, damien. now to developing news. reports of an u.n. envoy. ukraine officials say it was kidnapped, but they say they were only threatened and not abducted.
climate so they need to learn how to handle droughts. other topics, alternative energy, agriculture and cyber- security. but the tech partnership is definitely the focus and here's what brown had to say about that. >> what a wonderful furthering of the deep connections that israel has not just with america but with california in particular and silicon valley as a very important example of all that. >> reporter: now, this is the first time we have a sitting israeli prime minister visiting california since 2006. before netanyahu made it here to silicon valley yesterday, he was in l.a. for the premiere of a new documentary that will air on cbs, highlighting and promoting israeli tourism. but the focus here in silicon valley is on the tech world. we'll have to see what they have to say. the talks continue inside the computer history museum. live in silicon valley, mark kelly, kpix 5. >>> it took half the morning commute to get bart trains running again through hayward. investigators have the tracks shut down after a train struck and killed a person near the south hayward station last ni
doing? to betrating the election head of the iaea, international atomic energy agency. because they did not like the guy they try to get rid of islier, that they knew -- it clear from cables, from vienna, from pyatt released by wikileaks, that pyatt was going insane amano is so happy for our support in making him head of the iaea and now he has asked us for a little more money because he would like to fix up his office. it is so apparent what state department types are now doing and covert action style, political action sort of thing, to create the right results. the iaea is a big deal, ok? pyatt played a crucial role in that and now houston the bidding of likes the victoria nuland am who i would describe as a prima donna assistant secretary of state to european affairs who is doing no one any good, cookies or not. >> i want to turn to comments made by russian ambassador to the united nations over the weekend. >> the best way to resolve the crisis is to look artist every 21st agreement and try to do things the way they were described there. they need to have a constitutional dialogue an
, angela merkel of germany said she wasn't keen on the idea. a lot of energy flows from russia and through russia into western europe, to ukraine and other places as well. it will be a test of the president to see, you know, whether he can rally the international community, as he's fond of calling it, to actions that will matter to vladimir putin. >> to all the talk of feckless international policy and the inability to do anything about this and they're not looking at military options, there are still levers this administration can pull, as you mentioned, the g-8, other economic levers, freezing bank account, that could have a significant impact. >> yeah, john kerry was even talking about some of them. these things matter. look, we saw the country, even as isolated a country as iran was crippled by sanctions. i'm not saying that we're capable of doing the same thing with russia, but it is an example of what these kinds of financial sanctions can do. they can make people within the country feel it, and the country as a whole feel it. russia's economy is not great. and it needs trade with na
through this very difficult period and buy energy supplies into the country. also, expertise being given by the u.s. to the finance ministry and central bank to plan their economy a little bit better. what's happening now is that john kerry is speaking with members of the interim ukrainian government to talk about what concrete steps the united states and others in the international community can take to help them out in this difficult position, to try and put pressure on the russians and get them through this very tight financial squeeze that they are going to be in over the coming weeks and months. >> matthew chance in kiev. we are waiting for secretary of state, john kerry. he will hold a news conference there in about 30 minutes. we will get that live. i want to go to christiane amanpour. let's talk about president vladmir putin. he said that the current government in ukraine is illegitimate and russia reserves the right to use more force in ukraine if he wants to. those are strong words. amidst all that, you detected if not conciliation, at least reason to hope that the situation wi
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